AmeriCorps Hope for the Homeless

The focus of the AmeriCorps Hope for the Homeless (“AmeriCorps HFTH”) program is to reach out to individuals and families in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles, who are often unaware of the help that is available to them.  AmeriCorps HFTH links those in need with available resources and provides specialized services that include distribution of hygiene kits, clinical information, and service referrals.

A majority of the AmeriCorps HFTH members are themselves graduates of local shelter and treatment programs. With a genuine understanding and compassion which is critical for people in the Skid Row area who often have a difficult time trusting others, they really know how to pay it forward.

The Weingart Center is the lead agency for the AmeriCorps HFTH program, which works in partnership with Department of Health Services (DHS), Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA), Society of St. Vincent de Paul Cardinal Manning Center, Exodus Recovery Northeast LA (NELA CES Hub), the People Concern, Broken Hearts Ministry (Midtown CES hub), and The City and the County of Los Angeles. Hope for the Homeless is an LACPC initiative.

HISTORY

Our Start
Members of the Los Angeles Central Providers Collaborative (LACPC), an alliance of organizations committed to addressing issues of poverty and homelessness recognized that the highly effective organizations in downtown were often operating at maximum efficiency, but the need for services kept increasing. Through the efforts of the Collaborative and an AmeriCorps grant, the Hope for the Homeless program was created to address this need.

What We Do
The program recruits formerly homeless individuals and those passionate about changing the current homeless crisis, to engage individuals living on the streets and connect them to vital services. Members supply support and resources to service organizations in Los Angeles to help them increase advocacy and success for clients.

Our Street Outreach Team
Team member engage individuals living on the streets.  They meet individuals where they are and address their immediate and long-term needs. Outreach teams disseminate information, food, clothing and hygiene items. In addition, team members assess individuals using the coordinated entry system (CES) tool to prioritize housing for those who are most vulnerable. AmeriCorps HFTH members simplify the process for securing permanent supportive housing by advocating and accompanying clients to all necessary appointments.

Our Volunteer Team
Volunteer team members develop and implement a collaborative-based volunteer recruitment, training and management program for volunteers.  The team produces and disseminates materials and speaks about our program at local colleges, civic groups and community meetings.  Members educate volunteers about the community and the effect their volunteerism will make in achieving our objective to end homelessness.  Members build relationships with multiple levels of management within our partnerships to create volunteer opportunities to assign individual volunteers.

Click here to donate to our AmeriCorps Hope for the Homeless Program.

contact us For more information regarding AmeriCorps volunteer opportunities, please call us at (213) 689-3084.


AmeriCorps Resources

  • If you are interested in participating in an AmeriCorps program located in California or any other state, please visit www.americorps.gov
  • If you are interested in volunteering and you live in California, please contact www.californiavolunteers.org

 

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The Weingart Center for the Homeless provides comprehensive human services to homeless men, women, veterans, parolees, families, HIV+ and other at-risk individuals, giving them the skills, resources, and hope they need to lead productive lives off the streets. Located in the heart of Downtown Los Angeles' Skid Row, the Weingart Center for the Homeless is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that breaks the cycle of homelessness and poverty.

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